Metaverse, Apple XR, and the Value of Augmenting Original Ideas

Summary

I am a content creator, I create comics and cartoons using emerging technology to inspire, educate and entertain people. I want to make Black people enjoy their experiences, that’s what I do. Med school has caused me to take an introspective approach in finding ways to integrate the arts into healthcare education, allowing people to explore themselves or explore the things that happen within them, thus creating an immersive experience for patients and professionals alike, as health education is essentially learning about ourselves and what works and what doesn’t work with ourselves.  It’s all about helping each other out as we advance in this technological age. This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast/support

MedSchool and the XR Revolution: Unapologetically Black

Summary

What would Augmented Reality look like from an unapologetically Black perspective? How do you create and pursue ideas without losing your identity? These are the questions that propelled me forward in my creative journey as an AR developer, Black content creator, and a social activist. In this video, I talk about the manifestation of my ideas and projects that led me to finding a medium that didn’t force me to compromise on the decisions of things I wanted to make, instead AR opened up a door of infinite possibilities that can be used to help shape a future that benefits everybody, particularly Black people. Even more so, I also decided to develop a whole curriculum that is at the intersections of Black identity, content creation, just being an artist, being an activist, and being a technologist. — This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast/support

Transcription

Reflecting back on the journey:

2:16-3:02 “My process of trying to learn Blender, I just got a course off of Udemy and I was just recording myself watching it and learning and hopefully just in a public platform other people could learn as I was learning. I thought just that level of transparency was valuable because you would often get that opportunity in school or you’d get that opportunity if you’re working as a new person on a job. Just a 2–3-hour stream of going through some courses and being out there like that, it felt like it was a way to get connected.”

3:55-4:59 “When you start to lose things or people in general like I was during the pandemic, not because things were being taken from you but just the opportunities were not available and when the opportunities are not available you’ve got to figure stuff out. The feeling that I have about how I have stuff to offer but I don’t know what the opportunities are, being able to share and sort of build a community to create opportunities, that led me to this idea that there’s a potential, there’s a vision for Black creators in the AR space in particular or just XR in general. There’s a space for Black creators… a space to exist that you don’t have to ask permission for.”

 and that space does have to be carved out and manifested but there’s an opportunity and there’s a space to exist that you don’t have to ask permission for.”

5:30-6:05 “I ended up having the opportunity to do an AR project for a Black owned magazine and I just had this vision of what would AR look like from an unapologetically Black perspective? I sort of took on that project and developed it from the ground up just to manifest that vision for a client that essentially didn’t even know what AR was. So, I think that was something really fortunate of me to do.”

6:11-6:40 “How do you be innovative and also sort of propel the culture forward? How do you create and pursue ideas without losing your identity? And I think that that’s always something that Black creators have to develop and manifest or reckon with.”

7:52-8:00 “It’s that in order to sort of grow and innovate as a Black artist, you have to lose the Black.”

8:24-8:44 “I want to use this as a platform to explore my ideas and create a space for myself that allows me to be creative that I could control. That is not going to lose opportunities because of the pandemic and also as I start to grow as a developer.”

9:32-9:45 “To get insights that you would often pay a consultant hundreds of thousands of dollars for, you could find that on a podcast or somebody could share that with you and build a community just to find support.”

10:00-11:08 “It says something for a Black person to innovate and be an artist and be a creator and also be vulnerable and also be a thought leader. So, just exploring that dichotomy and manifesting that within myself and putting it out there, I just wanted to see what would happen because health disparities exist and all of these different things that are happening, especially now. A lot of Black celebrities that we grew up on – AJ Johnson to DMX to Michael K. Williams, things are happening and its Black people that are experiencing and falling to these things. So, it’s like how do you sort of balance that with Black artists and creators that are thinking about the future despite that looming reality that that future may be more contemporary than futuristic.”

12:22-12:49 “One of the goals was that as I learn I want to share and essentially transmit information that I found and I’ve experienced to people just on the internet and be available in that capacity to hopefully inspire people to just take on that journey themselves. Whether you’re an artist yourself, a developer, the goal was to just be a resource for people.”

Looking Towards the Future:

15:40-16:38 “For people that know what it’s like to be an athlete and to try to find your identity after you finish playing football or any sort of college or professional sport, that idea of identity and crisis and who are you and what defines you now? That was a moment where I really felt like I wasn’t defined by the stuff that I was able to do physically and it was actually just ideas that I came up with and so my mind really manifested these opportunities. And to think that that was just a byproduct of an idea that I just wanted to create something that allowed me to express myself as a Black person that loves technology and loves the idea of innovation. It just felt like it mattered.”

18:13-18:52 “I also decided to develop a whole curriculum that is at the intersections of Black identity, content creation, just being an artist, being an activist, and being a technologist and saying what does it look like to create innovative projects that allow you to build your portfolio, develop the skills that will prepare you for this XR revolution that will be coming and also give you something cool that you can share with your friends and be expressive about?”

19:12-20:43 “At this point I’ve been an artist for the past 10 years and out of all the years of me creating, when I got introduced to XR it felt like I didn’t need to compromise on the decisions of things I wanted to make. If I was making a comic, I had to compromise with the fact that I couldn’t animate in a comic form, I couldn’t have sound effects, I couldn’t have these crazy explosions because they would all be still images. And I also had to determine whether I wanted color printing because colored printing is freaking expensive so I had to do Black and white pages because that’s all that I could afford, could only have a certain page count, paper is only so big, and you had to choose what images you were going to draw, you couldn’t draw all the images and have them play in front of people, right? And so, when I created my AR comic and just demoed it out, I was able to record the voices, I had sound effects, I had animation in it, I had color, all of those different things and then on top of that I could still have my illustrated pages and then I was just layering stuff on it. And to take it to the next level I actually had interactions in it to where people could press buttons on the page and unlock different things from it.”

21:55-22:22 “Its a healthy level of creativity and competition that only makes things better and if Black people are involved and Black people are doing well with it, then even better because then things are always going to feel safe and helpful and healthy for me to continue being a creator in this space and that’s really important to me.”

23:23-23:40 “The value to me is not the products themselves but what those products represent. Those products represent a gateway to a new way of thinking and a new skill level that will continue to have more value in.”

24:43-25:12 “Other creators need to experience this and other creators can take things that they’ve been working on and they could shift it just with adding technology to it. I mean we all use our phones and we all use our devices and so how do you utilize those devices to help you go down this pathway of being a successful creator that inspires people and then you just pay it forward.”

Being a Content Creator While Attending Medical School:

27:20-28:28 “It has made me not question my decisions for other things but it’s made me see where my convictions lie with my interest as a creator and my interest as being an academic and also my interest in being, in many ways somebody that wants to continue inspiring and pushing myself. Because the looming thing about it is when you look at all of the stuff I’ve put out, it doesn’t necessarily say medical school but the fact is that I’m in medical school. It’s like how do I balance my interest in wanting to be a physician with my interest of continuing to be an artist and the Black AR guy, how do I continue to be the Black AR guy and be a medical student? And during a pandemic with all of these different things.”

28:41-30:07 “I’m also 1 of 4 Black students in a class of 70 and I feel that a lot. Mainly because when we’re talking about health disparities you instantly start to think about Black Lives Matter, how Black people are disproportionately being affected by Covid compared to other populations, the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments, and healthcare hesitancy and all that stuff and then you look around and see that you’re like the only person in the room that represents that population. You also realize that you’re one of the only people that have that opportunity to be a representative for that. And it comes with a layer of responsibility that can be debilitating sometimes. Where you get stuck like oh crap, I have to do right by my people by doing well and I can’t mess up, I can’t do these things.”

34:30- 35:20 “I’m always wondering not whether I should do it but what does it look like for this to actually just be a thing? What does it look like for somebody to come into an office and as they’re getting treatment, they get to go on a journey of what that treatment looks like through AR, VR, or just XR in general? What if before somebodies’ surgery, they can download an app and see what that procedure actually looks like and see how the procedure works through animation and AR right in your living room? What if you get to explore your body and get to learn more about yourself through this experience that can often be traumatizing?”

42:55-43:34 “One, I want to see more Black people in the space but I just want to see more people inspired to think that they can create something out of nothing and have an impact on people’s lives that doesn’t have to be sports related or that doesn’t have to be focused on going viral. It’s just all about sharing and pushing people to use the things around them to be better and create a better world.”

47:34-48:22 “Ultimately just creating an environment or at least creating a resource for people to go to and have access to on YouTube or whatever that just really feels inspiring. Not inspiring because you go to this and you learn how to make something but inspiring in terms of what does it look like to just be unapologetic about who you are and then also explore these sorts of whimsical random ideas that may be worth 100,000 dollars in the next 5-10 years.”

48:35-49:18 “We live in a capitalistic society and if something is worth that much money in society, it’s very very valuable and people will treat it with the value and the respect that it deserves. Often, because I can speak as a Black creator and an artist, you often don’t know what the value is of the things that you do. And often there are people that tell you that it doesn’t have value. So, t be able to do things that have such a high value in society, it encourages you to want to do more of that.”

49:30-49:49 “Technology is the future but that doesn’t mean that you need to deviate from the arts, that doesn’t mean you need to deviate away from culture, it doesn’t mean you need to deviate away from the things that you’re currently doing. You just need to progress with the technology as the technology matures so will you.”

56:26-57:49 “What does it look like to have a space where you can put things that pertain to Black people in a space that’s not going to get vandalized, it’s not going to get overly policed, you can be Black in society and not have to worry about freaking racists and Proud Boys and all those people trying to mess it up. The thing that I have always found just so insincere is that people will have no problem putting up racist monuments and then trying to ruin your livelihood for trying to speak out and doing something about just the very nature of having a confederate monument right in front of your house, especially as a Black person that pays taxes. But then have the audacity to deface, destroy, fine you for trying to put up and honor people that fell victims to the oppressive society that we’re supposed to be past.”

1:00:05-1:01:06 “Colin Kaepernick, just the many athletes, the many people that have said things and had their livelihoods taken away from them as a punishment for the things that they had to say about experiences that people are having. I will say ‘taken away’ because their livelihoods were changed because they decided to do something about something that has plagued Black and brown people, particularly Black people since the ages. So, how dare they use a platform that they worked hard for to gain and have access to say how they feel about certain things?”

1:02:00-1:02:35 “That is a level of pride that incorporates culture in a very authentic way that you can’t package and you can’t sell as a business-to-business solution. The only way that you could achieve that is if you empower people to explore an idea and build a community around that idea that empowers other people to participate in that.”

1:03:22-1:03:30 “It’s really that idea of what is it like to be unapologetically Black and use technology to be even more unapologetic about it?“

Damien McDuffie⎜Exploring Blackness in XR- AR, VR, & MR

Summary

Damien McDuffie joins us on The Official Stuck On An Eyeland Podcast. Damien is a writer, strategist, creative ecosystems builder, program director, and community consultant. His main goal is to help ease the process for Black creators in the XR industry and create cultural archives that are preserved for generations to come through AR.  Damien and I had a great conversation about the realities of navigating the tech industry while Black and how XR can be used to impact the people around us.

Notable Time Stamps:

Objectives: 

17:00-17:17   “Trying to build an AR platform for Black art and a Black cultural archive. Really figuring out ways to use all of our archives and use photos and family heirlooms and things like that to add value to them and add different AR experiences to them in different ways”

17:27-17:45   “AR allows you to bring some of these real valuable things like archives and papers that are precious and all of that without having to really kind of handle them and now you can add some production behind it and you can do all of these other things with it” 

20-30-20-54  “That was one of the things that kind of got me in the impetus of wanting to create a platform. One, to make the creation of AR experiences easier for Black people in particular but because I was able to have these experiences and bring people into using AR that would not have really kind of even messed with it or glanced at it” 

22:48-23:10  “I like the idea of controlling the technology and not just being the content creator cause that’s what I want to do, I want to create the content but I want to make sure at least whoever I’m creating for at least is going to be some Black tech platform and if it’s not there then I’m going to try to do something with that.” 

XR Industry: 

2:50-3:03 “Being connected and talking to creators around this new space, there’s a lot of enthusiasm around XR around AR in particular” 

8:50-9:09 “The great thing about mixed reality is that it’s magic but also a great thing about it is that it’s just math really. Functionality and tools, right? There are going to be two different people that are gonna take the same tool and think about it in a different way“ 

16:33-16:52  “I know the value of data science and all of that but I never saw an entry way for me to be motivated enough to kind of go after it. Once I was able to bring the creativity in, then it was like oh, okay now I’m looking into just getting my skills up.” 

Getting Started: 

9:39-9:52 “The thing is you have to find your teacher, you have to find the right person that you can tolerate hearing that also can tell the right stories that allows you to learn” 

11:58-12:02  “Learning in the way that you know you learn best and exploring that” 

11:29-11:53  “They’ll make a reference of you know, an image target, or an asset, or a 3D object, or whatever that is and then I just take that information, isolate it over here and just use my history as a researcher and historian, learn as much as I know and then I can come back, rewatch it and now when he says it I understand what he’s saying the first time that he says it.” 

27:22-27:32   “My main goal was really to understand enough to know how to ask the right questions and to get what I needed to get” 

Development: 

20:56-21:10  “I’m the archvst with the Dr. Huey P. Newton foundation so part of my role is figuring out creative ways to get all of these archives out so people can see them while not always just being on the internet” 

21:12-21:34  “We did a pop up exhibition for a memorial with Dr. Newton and it was in my neighborhood in west Oakland and we had people from 5 all the way up to like 75-80, elders and things like that interested in wanting to have the experience because of what the content was. 

24:37-24:58  “I come from a background of journalism and creative non fictions so writing those stories and in that it’s about 3% Black and if you’re talking about Black males in that MFA crowd or whatever, it’s very very slim and it’s the same thing when you crossover into animation. “ 

Key Links: 

Website: https://hueypnewtonfoundation.org/ 

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/damien-mcduffie-mfa-10928513 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wordxlife/?hl=en 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/wordxlife?lang=en 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/damien.mcduffie 

This episode is sponsored by

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Dan Edwards⎜Art, Tech, and Activism

Summary

Dan Edwards joins us on The Official Stuck On An Eyeland Podcast. Dan is a traditional portrait sculptor that uses his talent to reflect the times. You may have seen some of his work on artists such as Nipsey Hussle, Denzel Curry, and George Floyd. In this episode, Dan talks about the difference between when to profit off of art and when to create something for the people that’s accessible to all.

Notable Time Stamps:

Background: 

10:22-10:36  “I’m old school, I was trained old school. I was trained by The New York Academy of Art in figure and portrait. We used clay and wax, and made brass and bronze molds, it’s old school.” 

Work History: 

7:24-7:29  “I was a public sculptor back in most of the 90’s” 

7:50-8:28   “I did a monument to Martin Luther King Jr. And Robert Kennedy back in 1995. From that point, I started working closely with the King Family, Isaac Farris at The King Center in Atlanta for another project that ended up in the Olympic Village in 1996. That project was a series of portraits of Olympic gold medalists from 1920 to people in the 80’s.” 

8:51- 9:05 “The next series was of Negro League Baseball players. So, what I would do with all these people, prominent people, noteworthy people, historic people is I would travel to their home and sculpt” 

9:07-9:21 “Then I moved to sculpting Blues performers that were still around and they were harder to get in contact with, the managers wouldn’t allow that so I would just show up to shows and sculpt at shows” 

What made you want to do this type of work? 

7:34-7:48   “I do agree that if it’s not right for the time, it needs to be taken down, just like buildings do. Architects don’t have a hard time putting their building up in a new place where an old one used to stand”  

“There’s a lot against you but that’s really the fun of it all” 

“If you had something that you could add to help people move through this, then do it. That was like a no brainer.” 

Sculpting artists at hip hop shows with his son:

23:45-24:01  “And so what you do is you learn how to be very efficient and make the right observations. And so going with my son, we push each other. So, you glance over at the other persons work and say “oh man, he’s nailing it. I better bring it” 

43:28-44:07  “We put up sculptures and statues of congressman, you know so for me that’s a paid gig potentially…. but a bust of George Floyd, that belongs to the people. That’s how you do a sculpture of George Floyd is make it accessible to people and take into their communities. “ 

106:57- 107:08 “You have to want to do it, even if the encouragement is there a person has to want to do that thing.” 

109:08- 109:30  “I’m a traditional portrait scultpter and so what’s needed in my time period? We don’t need anymore white male politician busts, we don’t need that. You want your work to be relevant to the time that you live in” 

110:22-1:10:45 “People question why we do this all the time and it’s like obviously it depends on the time, the landscape, what’s going on, that you can find the answer for or not find the answer for. I think that people actually revolting and taking down the statues, I find that to be a very helpful thing.” 

Key Links: 

Website: https://hiphopallstars.art/about/ 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/officialdanieledwards/ 

Sketchfab: https://sketchfab.com/dedwards2 

This episode is sponsored by

· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast/support

2021 Trends in AR and Medicine, B2B solutions, and Consumer applications

Summary

After a year of navigating the Augmented Reality Industry both as a consumer and a developer, I started to notice trends in a variety of tangential fields: medicine, the arts, and business to business.

Read the blog: https://medium.com/@stuckonaneyelnd

Listen to the Podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast

Watch on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPpMod_DXYqC3xWgub79MFTm5Ym8eVcu_

Download Augmented Reality App: https://iltopia.com/eyelndfeevrapp

Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/iltopia

Buy Merch: https://shop.iltopia.com

This episode is sponsored by

· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast/support

1 Year in Augmented Reality Recap

Summary

I recap a remarkably interesting year of Augmented Reality Development. Things have been remarkably interesting, especially this year. One of the things that I am enormously proud of is the fact that I spent literally a year in AR, and because of that I learned so much. I feel like it took a pandemic for me to get a career. I think that is just pretty crazy to me. For the most part it has been an interesting year to say the least. One year in Augmented Reality I was able to accomplish literally opening unity for the first time; to going ahead and making my first app called Eyelnd Feevr that I released in January, and I started working in this pseudo influencer YouTube video maker and online educator thing. I essentially took on the idea of exploring my identity as a black creator and sharing that with the world.

Read the blog: https://medium.com/@stuckonaneyelnd

Listen to the Podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast

Watch on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPpMod_DXYqC3xWgub79MFTm5Ym8eVcu_

Download Augmented Reality App: https://iltopia.com/eyelndfeevrapp

Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/iltopia

Buy Merch: https://shop.iltopia.com

This episode is sponsored by

· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast/support

2020 Was Wild: Augmented Reality, COVID, New Opportunities, and a Year of Madness!

Summary

2020 was supposed to be off to a great start but the luck gods obviously had other plans.  

I recap the highs and lows of the year, and reflect on all the opportunities that came my way in life, augmented reality, medical school, and as a creator.

Read the blog: https://medium.com/@stuckonaneyelnd

Listen to the Podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast

Watch on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPpMod_DXYqC3xWgub79MFTm5Ym8eVcu_

Download Augmented Reality App: https://iltopia.com/eyelndfeevrapp

Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/iltopia

Buy Merch: https://shop.iltopia.com

This episode is sponsored by

· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast/support

I Made an Augmented Reality App that Triggered Racists

Summary

I Made an Augmented Reality App that Triggered Racists. With all this stuff going on in the world: COVID, Social Unrest, Police Brutality, I decided to make a statement with my work. I had to make an Augmented Reality app for the movement.

Read the blog: https://medium.com/@stuckonaneyelnd

Listen to the Podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast

Watch on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPpMod_DXYqC3xWgub79MFTm5Ym8eVcu_

Download Augmented Reality App: https://iltopia.com/eyelndfeevrapp

Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/iltopia

Buy my Augmented Reality Books: https://iltopia.com/product-category/books/

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast/support

How to Make AR Interactive Art

Summary

So today I decided to turn a sketch on paper into an interactive art piece using Unity, Augmented Reality, and Vuforia. The goal was to see how awesome I can make a simple drawing and push the idea of combining technology and art as far as I could take it. At the end of this little journey, I ended up with a sketch of a character named Cubey, an AR app for my Android phone, and a pretty cool experience to play with.

Check out my free course on Art, Tech, and Activism in Augmented Reality: https://gum.co/OWHaN

If you go to this link, you can take my Skillshare courses for free and have 2 free months of Skillshare: https://skl.sh/3ihvu0Y

Read the blog: https://medium.com/@stuckonaneyelnd

Listen to the Podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast

Watch on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPpMod_DXYqC3xWgub79MFTm5Ym8eVcu_

Download Augmented Reality App: https://iltopia.com/eyelndfeevrapp

Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/iltopia

Buy my Augmented Reality Books: https://iltopia.com/product-category/books/

This episode is sponsored by

· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast/support

Does America Need College Football During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

Summary

Does America really need college football right now? With everything going on with COVID-19, the last thing I though I would be spending my time weighing in on whether we should have College Football this season. For those that are unaware, I played college football for 6 years. 4 years at Hawaii, and 2 years at Oregon State. I had two season ending injuries that granted me extra eligibility. Thankfully, I earned a master’s degree, built great relationships, and started for the Beavers as a defensive back. As I pursue medical school, being a student-athlete is an aspect of my journey that launched many of my current interests. I felt it was necessary to use my story and experiences to give some context to why people are talking about this right now, and why specifically with football and not any other sport. 

Go to the blog for links and references: https://medium.com/@stuckonaneyelnd/does-america-need-college-football-during-the-covid-19-pandemic-d402f7c49e2c?source=friends_link&sk=b56a941b1fec8f6b2c6c07f973ac33ac

This episode is sponsored by

· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stuck-e-podcast/support